Blurring the Boundaries of Wood: Highly Unconventional Interiors

Unconventional Wood Interior 1

Who says that wood used as the defining element of an interior has to be confined to the walls, ceiling or floor in any conventional sense? Timber-lined spaces have existed since almost the very beginning of civilization, but for practicality’s sake, we usually keep it simple. But that doesn’t mean we can’t, or shouldn’t, think way beyond the typical when using wood in homes, hotels, museums, shops and other spaces.

Unconventional Wood Interior 2

The HotelHotel Lobby by March Studio, located in Canberra, Australia, is a prime example of just how creative architects can get with pieces of wood that really aren’t any different from what you’d normally find at a lumber retailer.

Unconventional Wood Interior 4

“The lobby, designed by March Studio, projects a unique identity through thousands of lengths of repurposed timber, blurring boundaries while directing views and movement,” say the architects. “A grand stair – the stage for performances as much as idle procrastination – leads up to the HotelHotel lobby and bar.”

“In the stair the timber is heavy, grounded, a stacked agglomeration. Freed to scatter up the walls and across the ceiling, the suspended timber filters exterior light and views into and from internal spaces. Spidery, pixellated shadows are cast on the floor and bare walls.”

Unconventional Wood Interior 3

The result almost feels like an explosion of wood, lights peeking out from among the slats, drawing the eye all around the space. It feels dynamic and exciting.

Want to see more like this? Check out the work of famed Japanese architect, Kengo Kuma.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *